Rutgers LAS

Laboratory Animal Services (LAS)

LAS Recommends: Articles of Interest

Here you will find items we think will be of interest to animal researchers – research papers, animal models, techniques, websites, products and more. 

If you have suggestions you would like to see listed here, contact us.

Procedures with Care (Excellent animal procedure videos)

CIEA NOG mouse, a new immune deficient mouse from Taconic (posted 9/10/2010)

Taming anxiety in laboratory mice (posted 9/17/2010) 

Production of p53 gene knockout rats by homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells (posted 9/23/2010)

Coding of facial expressions of pain in the laboratory mouse (posted 9/23/10)
 


Procedures with Care (Excellent animal procedure videos)
This new web site provides information to assist research workers in developing their skills in the administration of substances to laboratory animals. Initially we have provided material dealing with rats and mice, since they are the animals most widely used in research. Further material will be added to expand the range of techniques and species.
 


CIEA NOG mouse, a new immune deficient mouse from Taconic
Numerous "humanized" mouse models have been developed over the past twenty years. Components of the human immune system can be reconstituted in a mouse after transplantation of fetal thymus and liver (thy/liv) or fetal thymus, liver and bone marrow (BLT). These models are technically complex, requiring a source of fetal tissue and sophisticated surgical techniques.

Now, a breakthrough new mouse model permits engraftment of human cells via simple tail vein injection. Just inject hematopoetic stem cells (derived from human cord blood or other sources), and the CIEA NOG mouse® will engraft and differentiate those cells to form a functioning human immune system in a mouse. Never before has it been so easy to work with a mouse with a humanized immune system.
 
So put away your scalpel and pick up a syringe!

How will you use the CIEA NOG mouse®? This groundbreaking model has been validated for studies in oncology, infectious disease, xenotransplantation of normal human tissue and more.
(Source: www.Taconic.com Rutgers LAS has no business relationship with Taconic)
CIEA NOG (mouse Vendor brochure)
Animal ordering information



Taming anxiety in laboratory mice
Jane L Hurst & Rebecca S West
Nature Methods(2010) DOI:doi:10.1038/nmeth.1500
Published online 12 September 2010

Routine laboratory animal handling has profound effects on their anxiety and stress responses, but little is known about the impact of handling method. We found that picking up mice by the tail induced aversion and high anxiety, whereas use of tunnels or open hand led to voluntary approach, low anxiety and acceptance of physical restraint. Using the latter methods, one can minimize a widespread source of anxiety in laboratory mice.

 



Production of p53 gene knockout rats by homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells
Tong, et al. Nature doi:10.1038/nature09368 (2010)
The use of homologous recombination to modify genes in embryonic stem (ES) cells to engineer genes has not previously been possible in rats because of the absence of germline-competent ES cells in this species. We have recently established authentic rat ES cells. Here we report the generation of gene knockout rats using the ES-cell-based gene targeting technology.

Coding of facial expressions of pain in the laboratory mouse

Langford, et al. Nature Methods  doi:10.1038/nmeth.1455

Facial expression is widely used as a measure of pain in infants; whether nonhuman animals display such pain expressions has never been systematically assessed. We developed the mouse grimace scale (MGS), a standardized behavioral coding system with high accuracy and reliability; assays involving noxious stimuli of moderate duration are accompanied by facial expressions of pain. This measure of spontaneously emitted pain may provide insight into the subjective pain experience of mice.